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Are Hair Loss Treatments Effective?

By 06/11/2020February 6th, 2022No Comments6 min read
Are Hair Loss Treatments Effective?

Are Hair Loss Treatments Effective? Hair loss (alopecia) is a natural phenomenon in all animals that causes hair loss that usually occurs during the hair growth cycle. It is estimated that most people (assuming they have a full head of hair) lose about 100 hairs in 24 hours. Hair loss can become a cosmetic problem when it occurs in the wrong place at the wrong time to the wrong person. Actual hair loss should be distinguished from damage to the hair shaft, which can cause breakage near the scalp. This type of damage is often caused by exogenous chemicals used to change the natural characteristics of the hair shaft (hair dye, etc.) or other forms of self-medication.

Normal hair thinning (resulting from the tiny follicle) that includes the temples, the frontal hairline and the scalp, known as “pattern alopecia”, occurs in almost everyone as they grow older.

Doctors divide aesthetically significant hair loss into two categories.

Alopecia Scar: This type of irreversible hair loss is characterized by damage to the underlying skin that leads to scarring that destroys the hair follicle and its ability to regenerate. A simple visual examination is usually sufficient to diagnose this problem, although occasionally a biopsy may be required. Certain skin conditions as well as physical trauma cause such damage.

Scar-free alopecia: This type of hair loss is very common and can be caused by certain diseases, medications, aging, diet, and many other causes of genetic predisposition to hair loss called androgenetic alopecia.

There are three hair growth cycles: Growth (80% of the follicles), rest and shedding. In human hair, each follicle rotates at its own pace, unlike most animals, where these cycles change with the seasons and all hairs are in the same part of the cycle at the same time. This is why animals grow a thicker coat in the fall and shed more in the spring and why human beings do not shed. Unlike most animals, in humans, each hair has its own pattern of growth, rest and shedding.

Each person sheds their hair and rejuvenates their hair every day

When this balance is disturbed and more hair is lost from the effects of regeneration, alopecia or hair loss.

What causes hair loss?

Common causes of hair loss

Pattern baldness, a fleshy alopecia (androgenetic alopecia), is genetically determined. In sick people after the celebration, the hair follicles in the center of the scalp and above the temple begin to miniature, producing small, fine hairs that are difficult to see. This process is due to the metabolism of testosterone by an enzyme in the hair follicle. Generally, the hair follicles above the ears and around the back of the scalp do not have this enzyme, thus maintaining a margin of normal hair.

Female baldness is very similar to male pattern baldness, occurs after menopause and often saves the frontal hairline. It usually involves a total thinning of the hair.

Telogen effluvium is a phenomenon that occurs mainly in women, especially after pregnancy when there is a completely, spontaneously reversible hair loss.

Alopecia areata, a fleshy alopecia, is considered an autoimmune disease and is characterized by distinct, localized, abruptly marginalized areas of hair loss. This is characterized by spontaneous, but occasionally can lead to 100% loss of all body hair.

Medicines such as allopurinol (Zyloprim), oral vitamin A analogues, chemotherapeutic drugs and warfarin (Coumadin)

Poor diet and strict diet and some types of bariatric surgery

Uncommon causes of alopecia

  • Infections such as syphilis and fungal infections
  • Skin diseases such as lupus and lichen
  • Skin cancers
  • Male hormonal problems such as polycystic ovary syndrome
  • renal failure
  • Liver failure
  • Thyroid disease

What are the symptoms and signs that accompany hair loss?

Most people experience hair loss when they see themselves in the mirror or when others say so.

You can also find a lot of hair on your pillow in the morning or on your hairbrush or comb.

A woman may notice a reduction in the size of her ponytail or an enlargement of her part.

When should you seek medical help for hair loss?

If you have hair loss, you may want to see a doctor to evaluate if there are any medical reasons for hair loss and to evaluate if treatments are available for you.

Consult your doctor if you lose large amounts of hair every day and if you do not feel well at the same time you lose hair.

Most often hair loss occurs without other signs of illness.

If the following symptoms occur at the same time as hair loss, you may have a serious medical condition and you should see a doctor immediately.

  • Confusion
  • Bad appetite
  • Constipation
  • Diarrhea
  • Breath problem
  • Weight loss
  • Vomiting
  • Fever
  • Pain
  • Skin problems

There is no reason to seek emergency medical care for hair loss.

How do health professionals evaluate and diagnose hair loss?

Doctors, generally dermatologists and sometimes endocrinologists, diagnose hair loss by performing a natural examination of the hair shaft and underlying skin and the distribution of hair loss.

Graphs with photos of hair loss help to classify the amount and type of hair loss. These include the Hamilton and Ludwig classification charts.

  • Additional tests may be needed if the diagnosis is uncertain, especially if you have symptoms other than hair loss.
  • A hair pull test can be performed to examine multiple hair shafts microscopically for thickness, length, structure and growth phase and to determine if the abnormal number of hairs is falling out.

Different thickness and length occurs in the most common type of hair loss, androgenic alopecia.

Skin problems that lead to hair loss can be diagnosed by taking a skin and hair sample from the affected area. A doctor who examines it under a microscope can find a specific cause.

If hair loss is severe or there are other signs of illness, your doctor may order specific tests, including X-rays and blood tests.

What is the hair loss treatments?

If hair loss is caused by a disease, treating the disease is the best hair loss treatments. The decision to treat androgenetic alopecia depends on its emotional impact on the patient’s sense of well-being. Many different treatments are promoted to stop hair loss and hair regeneration. You should discuss these options with your doctor to determine their validity.

Are hair loss treatments effective?

Treatment options for androgenetic alopecia include skin care techniques, wigs and patches, medications and surgery.

The hair style that covers the areas with the most hair loss is effective for mild cases. Washing and styling your hair will not cause further hair loss.

As a result, are hair loss treatments effective? For more severe hair loss, wigs and patches can offer good results if you want to try them. Either of these options can be used in conjunction with medication or surgery if the results of the style or just the piece are not satisfactory.